AITA for not staying until my role is filled?

a month ago

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BirthdayOk1649

I work at a small company, with about 10 people full time, plus a handful of freelancers. Two weeks ago today I gave my two weeks notice at my company. There’s no bad blood, I just have a lot of personal shit going on (both with other people in my life and my own mental health) and I need more time off than I would be able to take while still employed here. I also disagree with some of the company practices, specifically not paying our interns, so it was time to go. When I gave my notice, I basically told my bosses that I need time to work out personal stuff and figure out what I want to do with my life and career. They thanked me for being transparent about it, and asked me if I was able to stay until they found my replacement, to help train them, etc. Here’s the thing: it’s been two weeks and they haven’t yet. They’ve been trying, but nobody has been hired. They have two huge projects coming together this week and next week so I feel bad leaving them with nobody. That being said, I am burned out. I parked at work this morning and felt my brain turn off. Would it be rude if I go back on my word and leave before they find my replacement?


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Comments

  • Ruckus55

    Would they let you stay to make sure you built up an emergency fund before firing you? No. So in a normal situation where you’ve got your life 100% together (none of us do so let’s call it 80%), I’d say flex at your own will. But you’ve got to put yourself first and let them know you’ll no longer be coming in as of tomorrow. Or have the conversation on the way out the door tonight. Or get up and leave this moment. You’ve been polite. You’ve been transparent. **You owe them nothing. You owe yourself everything. **

    a month ago

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    • TATORTOT76

      This is the way.

      a month ago

  • Surax

    What I would want from them is to say "New employee will be hired by X date. Training will last Y days/weeks." Unless they provide you with an exact timeline, I say cut your loses and leave. You have to look out for you, because they certainly won't.

    a month ago

    0

  • Wonderful__

    It's commonplace not to have a new hire after someone quit. I've done different jobs over the years and I've never met my replacement. I gave two weeks notice and they found someone (usually months later). If every company requires the employee who is leaving to stay on until the new person comes on board, then giving notice will be take months instead of 2 weeks. This is what the manager's job is there for. If they cannot train the new person, then that says more about the manager than about you. So no, just leave. If they insist and you're up for it, you can ask them to hire you as a consultant where you will charge X rate (usually 3 x or 4 x your current rate) for your time.

    a month ago

    1

    • BirthdayOk1649

      lol they’d never pay me more

      a month ago

  • whotiesyourshoes

    Two weeks notice is a courtesy and you gave them that. In most situations it's not feasible that a job can be filled in two weeks. But that's not your problem nd not your responsibility to wait around around until they fill the position. And ,not only that, as long as you stick around doesn't give them much incentive to move the search along. >I parked at work this morning and felt my brain turn off. I relate to this..I'm remote. My last day was supposed to be tomorrow. I got to mid day and just could not do it another minute. I sent them an updated resignation effective immediately and logged off. I feel zero guilt. Take care of you.

    a month ago

    1

    • BirthdayOk1649

      I think that this is what I’m going to do. Like I said, it’s a super small company and I do need to end on good terms to stay in my field but I think telling them that things have gotten worse for me and that I cannot be working any more at this time, effective immediately, is the best way to go about it

      a month ago

  • AOA_Nel

    >When I gave my notice You gave your notice, it's up to them to fill your role - not you.

    a month ago

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  • Zawaz666

    No. If they pull the 2 weeks card, tell them that you don't require 2 weeks if fired.

    a month ago

    1

    • BirthdayOk1649

      I also gave them my two weeks….two weeks ago

      a month ago

  • kozmonyet

    2 weks is a courtesy as someone else said...and one which I am betting they wouldn't have extended the other way if they were in straights which required immediate downsizing. Workers have been well trained to believe they "owe" a company more than that company is willing to give back in most cases. There are some places that really do give back to employees but in my experience, that is not the norm. And it doesn't matter whether small or large-- Except in the most basic job types, NEVER train a replacement without extra pay. In effect, you are doing extra work that is a higher level--and they recognize that higher level by asking you to train a newbie. So why would you feel obligated to do the extras for free or guilty for not? I know I sound bitter and probably am--I've just spent far too many years seeing good workers treated like liabilities rather than assets to a company and the most inherently responsible people (by their nature) being exploited for that nature. I don't know the situation but likely a gold star for you not agreeing about intern lack of pay. The IRS is **VERY** specific about what qualifies as an intern and companies cheat that all the time--thereby stealing from people. A basic list of requirements to qualify as an intern: The internship, even though it includes actual operation of the facilities of the employer, is similar to training, which would be given in an educational environment; The internship experience is for the benefit of the intern; The intern does not displace regular employees, but works under close supervision of existing staff; The employer that provides the training derives no immediate advantage from the activities of the intern and on occasion its operations may actually be impeded; The intern is not necessarily entitled to a job at the conclusion of the internship; The employer and the intern understand that the intern is not entitled to wages for the time spent in the internship. Wage theft like this is a huge problem in the USA.

    a month ago

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  • KarmaPharmacy

    You are absolutely not an asshole. Take time for your mental and physical health before you can’t recover from your burn out. You owe them nothing. You’re neither an owner nor a shareholder. If they cared that much about the company they’d have services in place for you to do your job without experiencing burnout

    a month ago

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  • WashedOut3991

    Lmao man work culture in America is so fucked.

    a month ago

    0

  • alkonium

    By making it open-ended, they've basically gotten you to stay so you they don't have to hire someone else. By leaving, you light a fire under them to actually hire a replacement.

    a month ago

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  • Select-Radish9245

    You gave them two weeks notice which is the standard courtesy. You owe them nothing else

    a month ago

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  • jkozuch

    No. You gave them two weeks notice. The two weeks is up. It's not your problem they haven't filled the role. As has been pointed out, you owe them nothing. You owe yourself everything.

    a month ago

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  • RevenantKing

    Why would they hire anyone when you're still there? You gave them two weeks, stay home.

    a month ago

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  • PunditusMaximus

    NTA

    a month ago

    0

  • Lakersrock111

    What’s the field? Remote work? Sales? If so I am all ears.

    a month ago

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  • Scullyx

    Yall seem friendly and they acting in good faith by actually looking, but there is a reasonable deadline for them to find a replacement. An extra week or two would be that limit to me. You did agree to stay extra.

    a month ago

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  • cbrrydrz

    Long story short, nope. The end.

    a month ago

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  • violetharley

    HELLS no NTA. I was at a small company. Family owned, everyone was tight, I liked and respected my boss (so I thought) and out of that same respect for him I hung in there instead of jumping ship when a few offers came my way once or twice. MISTAKE. BIG MISTAKE. HUGE. I got covid twice. On the second go around, he told me everything was fine and not to worry, and that SAME day that fucker put an ad up online for my replacement. Yeah, don't worry all right. He got her hired within three days, had her working my week's end, and within a week of him telling me not to worry and all was fine, he was calling me to tell me not to return. Go ahead and leave. Most employers are NOT loyal to you; no reason in the world to be loyal to them either because they won't reciprocate. Oh, and for the record: this job was also verbally abusive complete with workplace bullies, and I could feel my brain shut down too when I got there (I used to have to talk myself out of getting out of the car and walking in there). Not anymore. Get out now and let them take care of themselves.

    a month ago

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  • Live_Perspective3603

    Not at all! You gave them their two weeks, they didn't hire a replacement. Not your problem.

    a month ago

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  • thenewtwopointtwo

    Maybe leverage the situation? Let them know you’re burned out and need some more time off than what you’re getting and need more money if they expect you to continue on past your originally allotted timeframe. If they’re not willing to negotiate then they’re not worth staying for. If they are willing to negotiate and put your Well-being first, might be worth giving them a chance. Difficult to find good employers. My opinion.

    a month ago

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  • tawny-she-wolf

    You gave notice when you didn’t even have to, you’re not obligated to do anything else.

    a month ago

    0


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