Discussion

I'm having a good number of interviews, without them turning into job offers, and I'm not able to identify why.

a month ago

|

I'm a recent PhD in an Engineering field from a reputable university, and have a couple of years' working in the industry as well (Prior to my PhD). I have been looking to transition into the industry again (Fairly certain about not wanting to remain in Academia). I have had quite a few interviews, but I'm never able to convert them into job offers, and I'm unable to point out one specific reason. I have tried doing mock-interviews with other people, and in some cases, have been able to get feedback from hiring managers who had interviewed me as well, and I always get good feedback. For example, recently, I had multiple rounds of interview with a product development consulting firm, and I thought things went quite well. However, I ended up not being given an offer. The hiring manager who had reached out to me to apply for the position said that they were all impressed by my background, but hired someone else who had interned for them in the past, and suggested that I gain more 'internship experience' in any specific place I want to work at. In another case, the hiring manager said that I seemed very 'entrepreneurial', and I'm not entirely sure what he meant by that. At this point, I'm fairly exhausted and depressed - It seems pointless to keep trying to do the same thing over again without actually fixing potential issues. I've started looking at postdoc jobs in relevant geographic areas, so I can transition into the industry from there. What should my most effective strategy for identifying and fixing problems should be?




Want to comment? or with one click.




Comments
  • According_Guess1096

    It sounds like you’re doing all the right things to prepare including doing mock interviews. One additional thing that could be helpful is recording yourself via video and see if you have any features that others might not care to comment on and practice that. Otherwise, these sorts of things are crapshoots and even if you have the most amazing interview/credentials, someone else might end up getting hired. The same thing is happening at my work now where we have an awesome candidate but the other person happened to have interned here as well and is friends with many on the team. You just have to keep applying and hoping for the best. Like dating, you just need that one company/person to believe in you.


    a month ago
    1

    Report

    Edit

    You have reported this post




    • universaladaptoid

      It's funny that you mention the dating analogy. I feel like I'm effectively catfishing employers by not being what they expect hah.


      a month ago

      Report

      Edit

      You have reported this post


  • inuksuk123

    Exactly, great advice. Don't give up & don't beat yourself up either. You have stellar credentials that you should be very proud of.


    a month ago
    1

    Report

    Edit

    You have reported this post




    • universaladaptoid

      Thank you.


      a month ago

      Report

      Edit

      You have reported this post


  • Welcome2B_Here

    Unfortunately, even with higher income positions and more sophisticated positions/companies, a candidate with a PhD will trigger biases that other "lower" educated candidates may not have to face. The perception of being "over-qualified" might already be baked into your application before even getting an interview, and in my opinion the "entrepreneurial" description likely means the interviewer was intimidated and/or felt that given the company's status quo you might rock the boat.


    a month ago
    0

    Report

    Edit

    You have reported this post



    • fabfreddy1969

      *The hiring manager said that I seemed very 'entrepreneurial', and I'm not entirely sure what he meant by that.* They mean that you were too experienced and wouldn't fall in line with whomever was managing you. They wanted someone younger that they could push around is the way I interpret that.


      a month ago
      0

      Report

      Edit

      You have reported this post



      • venusresourceguess

        I have had similar experience. My interviews/applications rate seems to be much better that a lot of peoples. However, I too have not had any offers. Though I do not reach out to ask for feedback, so I do not have as much a grasp on that as you seem to. Our background/experience is similar. I have an advanced degree, and a few years of experience. So I look good on paper, as it seems you do. However, my jobs have been at smaller places where I am asked to do a lot more than what my job title is. As such, I believe that I do not have the experience in the job title to the degree expected. This is the reason I don't get offers, in my opinion. I look good on paper. I look like I have the experience or even more than the experience that they want, but then in the interview my gaps show. It's just my theory, and may apply to you. To make myself look better, I have been self studying A LOT and have been making it past more rounds recently. So, hopefully it all comes together soon. It's hard, stick in there. The job market is really rough because a lot of people are looking, and I have heard from a number of places that have rejected me that they received applicants with far more years of experience than the job call asked for, so it is very possible you look great, but the competition is much higher than normal.


        a month ago
        1

        Report

        Edit

        You have reported this post




        • universaladaptoid

          Thank you for the reply. Hopefully, things get better soon for us!


          a month ago

          Report

          Edit

          You have reported this post


      • uglyplaid45

        My fiance is going after his PhD in engineering, and I truly wish you the best. Times are very tough right now. I recently learned of Spencer Ogden, a recruiting firm for oil, gas, and energy. Give them a try? All the best!


        a month ago
        1

        Report

        Edit

        You have reported this post




        • universaladaptoid

          Good luck to your fiance!


          a month ago

          Report

          Edit

          You have reported this post


      • [deleted]

        [deleted]


        a month ago
        1

        Report

        Edit

        You have reported this post




        • universaladaptoid

          Thank you! And yeah, I've heard only bad things about Cheeky Scientist.


          a month ago

          Report

          Edit

          You have reported this post


      • travel_lightly

        Having an entrepreneurial mindset could mean that you are an independent thinker and likely more advanced in your thinking than what they envision for the role. That sounds to me like they want somebody who’s more of a follower or fits nicely into a box without rocking the boat or leaving halfway should a better opportunity show up. That said, have you ever had any business ideas or things you would like to launch by yourself?


        a month ago
        1

        Report

        Edit

        You have reported this post




        • universaladaptoid

          I do have some ideas, and I'm actually currently in the process of writing a grant to try and get some initial funding. However, as with any such undertaking, it's not going to be an immediate thing, and I'm looking for something stable, especially because my wife and I are also wanting to start a family soon (Also, she's almost done with her PhD in a different STEM field, where jobs are currently scarce).


          a month ago

          Report

          Edit

          You have reported this post


      • iroll20s

        Part of it is getting a job is a numbers game in a lot of ways. Getting all the way to the end just means you're one of a handful of candidate. Eventually you'll be the top choice. Often there are no bad choices. If I had to guess at reasons- Is the PhD turning them off? It might be a mismatch for the positions and assume you'll be a flight risk. Second is just work experience is way more valued than education. At least if the job doesn't actually require it. Maybe they think your work experience is stale?


        a month ago
        0

        Report

        Edit

        You have reported this post